Develop Your Company’s Vision Statement

Develop Your Company’s Vision Statement

A Vision Statement is more than a detailed daydream.  It is the result of considerable research and soul-searching.  As the minutia of daily tasks, partner relations, and project management begin to consume an organization’s course, it is imperative that a navigation point be at hand to maintain a company’s necessary direction and unite all efforts toward a common goal.

Vision statements are for more than organizations.  Every outreach, department and individual can benefit from a clear aspiration for the future.

Your Vision Statement is your Polaris.

Company Vision Statement:

Before you begin writing your company’s Vision Statement, look at some examples (find Xponents’ Vision Statement here).  Note the length, tone, and overarching themes.  These elements will differ depending on the organization’s field, size, and scope – so try to find examples from companies that most align with your own.  The Vision Statement of the City Hospital will most likely differ significantly from a local dog-walking service, so try to keep things in perspective.

If appropriate (and it usually should be) gather other team members for input. The Vision of an organization should align with that of the founder or CEO, but every perspective is valuable, and can complement most visioning exercises.  The object is to identify the organization’s goals and principles. Here are some sample questions to help:

  • What is your company’s size: employees and reach?
  • What is your company known for?
  • What do you want your company to be known for?
  • What of your organization’s elements and accomplishments are you most proud?
  • What are your specific success measures?
  • What is your public appeal?
  • What will you absolutely not do?
  • What is your organization’s level of employee engagement and loyalty?
  • What are your “Mission Points”: What do we do, how do we do it, and for whom do we do it?
  • What is the founder’s vision?
  • What are your organization’s top offerings?
  • How do you generate new business?
  • Who are your ideal new hires?
  • What tasks and projects define your workdays?
  • What is the public opinion of your organization?
  • What is the company-goal for the future?

Craft your statement.  Ensure it is as equally inspiring as it is accurate. Keep your goals achievable, but don’t be afraid to dream big and aspire for great heights.  Use details gleaned from the question-exercise above to make your case for the future clearly and with factual support.  Once you’ve written it down, let it rest for a day or two, then revisit it with fresh eyes and work out a second draft.  Does your vision touch on all your key points in a clear, easily communicated way?  Does it really on stale industry jargon or complicated technical lingo? Can someone who is unfamiliar with your company and inexperienced in your industry clearly understand what you do and where you plan to go?

Pass it around to others: friends, family, employees, people whose opinion you trust.  After you have received and considered input from various sources, try another draft.

Once you are confident in your statement, distribute it to everyone in your organization.  Share it in newsletters and post it to your website.

To learn more about a personal Vision Statement, read Deb’s Blog here.